Signs for Autism

6 Months – NO BIG SMILES OR OTHER WARM, JOYFUL EXPRESSIONS
9 Months – NO BACK-AND-FORTH SHARING OF SOUNDS, SMILES, OR OTHER FACIAL EXPRESSIONS
12 Months – NO BABBLING
12 Months – NO BACK AND FORTH GESTURES SUCH AS POINTING, SHOWING, REACHING OR WAVING
16 Months – NO WORDS
24 Months – NO MEANINGFUL TWO WORD PHRASES (NOT INCLUDING IMITATING)
Any Age – ANY LOSS OF SPEECH, BABBLING OR SOCIAL SKILLS

Boy exercises putting fingers with therapist
OTA

Parent Participation Training

One of the most meaningful conversations you will have with your clinical team is the importance of parent participation. It has been proven that parents who are actively involved in their child’s therapy often see more progress in their children.

At home, it’s important to reinforce skills your child is learning in therapy by incorporating them into his or her daily routines. As with any skill, practice is key. Your child is with his or her therapist for only a small part of each day, so if lessons aren’t practiced at home, or if the child’s home experience is greatly different from what happens in therapy, it will take much longer to learn and reach goals.

For suggestions on how to incorporate learning skills at home, ask your team’s Clinical Supervisor or Clinician.

Talk with a clinician about getting services started for your child and learn how you can also help contribute to your son or daughter’s progress.

5 simple home-based activities

Try these 5 simple home-based activities that you can start doing right now:

  1. When your child asks for something, have them make eye contact with you before giving it to them.
  2. Practice simple exercises with your child like clapping, jumping and touching their nose or toes.
  3. Look through picture books and ask your child to find and point to specific pictures.
  4. Reinforce a specific communication skill (vocal, signs, etc.) by keeping a favorite item nearby but out of reach so the child must ask for it. Or keep the item in a clear plastic bin that’s not easy to open so the child must request “help” or “open.”
  5. Sing songs that have motions and have the child imitate your movements. Start with the “Itsy Bitsy Spider” or make up your own motions to any song you think your child would like.
AA-boy-blocks-with-staff